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How to draw snow in watercolor

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  • Author ★ Letta
  • December 10, 2016, 17:11

Winter has come, which means it's time for stories with snow! In this post I will talk about several ways to draw snowfall and show examples.

So the first way is the most obvious, in my opinion, to leave white places where necessary. Here is my example of such snowfall, I just drew random white circles with a brush, leaving the paper without ink.

The disadvantages of this method are that it is rather difficult to make blurry edges for small snowballs. Also, if you need to make a large area in this way, you need to work quickly and efficiently, otherwise the borders of the fill are obtained, in the middle of my picture you can see how it looks.

The second way is to use cotton buds or a napkin to dab the damp paint and remove the excess layer.

It turns out quite naturally and interestingly, especially if you combine with the previous method. Such snowballs look more natural and the paper in the place that is wiped remains not white, but with a light shade, which can also be used. However, you need to work quickly and not on every paper such an effect can work out well. If your paper quickly absorbs water, this method will not look spectacular.

The third way is to use a masking liquid.

It turns out very interesting, with clearly defined edges, the main thing is to wait until everything dries well, otherwise there is a great risk of lubricating everything. You can draw both round and oval shapes and even curls, everything will look cool. However, with this method, the pattern will look a bit decorative due to the sharp boundaries.

Instead of masking liquid, you can use wax or paraffin - in this case, the snow looks more natural, especially on textured paper, but the question remains how to remove the wax after finishing work. I know that you can iron it by putting absorbent paper on top of the picture, but I don’t know how it works with watercolors. Who tried, tell me, can I iron a watercolor?

An interesting effect is obtained when using salt on top of a wet watercolor, it looks like frosty patterns, but it is rather a stylization under the snow. By the way, mixing coarse and fine salt can get specks of different sizes.

And the last way is to paint on top of the watercolor fill with another opaque white paint.

In my example, I used acrylic, you can take gouache, a white gel pen, an interesting effect is obtained if the paint is sprayed with a toothbrush, for example.

Thus, you can draw snow using one of the techniques above, or you can combine several methods, depending on your tasks. In the gallery, I collected the works of different authors from the interest using various methods.

I hope now the image of snow will be a pleasant experience for you and you can make your work more picturesque.
Snowy watercolors to you!

Art materials

Watercolor paints:

  • French Ultramarine
  • Permanent Rose
  • Natural Sienna
  • Burnt Sienna
  • Herb Green (Sap Green)
  • Winsor Blue-Green (Winsor Blue Green Shade)
  • Neutral Tint
  • Transparent Oxide Brown
  • Permanent White or White Gouache

Other:

  • Nice pointed nylon stack
  • Sable brushes (sizes 6, 10 and 12), notched brush, size 2
  • Bockingford 300gsm sheet, NOT watercolor paper
  • 2B pencil
  • Camouflage liquid
  • Kitchen roll

Stretch a sheet of paper for watercolor on an easel. Use a 2B pencil to sketch out the key elements of the landscape. Save the brightest areas of snow with camouflage liquid. Use a beautiful nylon brush or a small pointed stack. Remember that the smears left by the masking liquid when it is removed will be white, so carefully consider their placement and role within the project at this stage. Let the paint dry completely.

Moisten the sky with clean water. Hold the easel at an angle of about 20 degrees and use a large brush (size 10 or 12) to apply the mixture of French Ultramarine and Permanent pink to the left, then apply Sienna Natural across and finally use the Blue-Green Tint of Winsor for the brightest part sky to the right. Let the color mix create soft, 'lost' edges. This will create a contrast to the sharper, more pronounced edges in most of the landscape.

When the sky area has dried, start adding some free, distant landscape details with color mixtures used in the sky with the addition of Grass Green and Neutral Tint for the farthest hills. See how you can use a dry brush to let white paper appear through the implied snow.

Hold the paper straight. With a mixture of French Ultramarine, Permanent Pink and Blue Vinzor, color the shadow cast by the wall. Pay particular attention to the right edge: the shadows should "sit" exactly at the level of the earth's surface, describing the angle at which the earth is located. The selected compound will granulate, add granularity and a more saturated structure to the snow. Within the shaded area, add more concentrated blends of blue and purple to add some zest.

The dark granite wall provides significant contrast mainly in light painting. Draw it with various mixes of French Ultramarine and Sienna Burnt or French Ultramarine and Transparent Brown Oxide. Create a structure by adding darker mixtures to the stones as if they were dry, but you should not do it where it recedes into the background, as this will distract attention.

With a good sable brush (size 6), start adding texture and details to distant hills. Use a mixture of French Ultramarine with Brown Oxide, Natural Siena with Burnt Siena, and Herb Green with French Ultramarine to paint it in trees and shrubs. Keep the brush very dry and add some snowy texture to the area above the main wall.

Be careful not to make the tones of distant parts too strong. Select some of the nooks and crannies in the wall and use the French Ultramarine with a Neutral Tint.

Remove masking fluid. With the same mixture of French Ultramarine and Permanent Pink used for the shadow of the wall painted in the snow on the peaks, leave a few unpainted areas for brightly lit areas. Pay attention to the rounded, dark edges of the snow to indicate its depth.

For pillars, use a mixture of French Ultramarine and Clear Brown Oxide, as well as twigs and grass stems that are pushed out from under the snow. Use a damp brush to soften some of the shaded areas.

Finally, add some white gouache to the sides and tops of the posts, and apply some snowflakes if you feel the need.

X ART MATERIALS

Watercolor paints:

  • French Ultramarine
  • Permanent Rose
  • Natural Sienna
  • Burnt Sienna
  • Herb Green (Sap Green)
  • Winsor Blue-Green (Winsor Blue Green Shade)
  • Neutral Tint
  • Transparent Oxide Brown (Transparent Ox>Other:

  • Nice pointed nylon stack
  • Sable brushes (sizes 6, 10 and 12), notched brush, size 2
  • Bockingford 300gsm sheet, NOT watercolor paper
  • 2B pencil
  • Camouflage liquid
  • Kitchen roll

Stretch a sheet of paper for watercolor on an easel. Use a 2B pencil to sketch out the key elements of the landscape. Save the brightest areas of snow with camouflage liquid. Use a beautiful nylon brush or a small pointed stack. Remember that the smears left by the masking liquid when it is removed will be white, so carefully consider their placement and role within the project at this stage. Let the paint dry completely.

Moisten the sky with clean water. Hold the easel at an angle of about 20 degrees and use a large brush (size 10 or 12) to apply the mixture of French Ultramarine and Permanent pink to the left, then apply Sienna Natural across and finally use the Blue-Green Tint of Winsor for the brightest part sky to the right. Let the color mix create soft, 'lost' edges. This will create a contrast to the sharper, more pronounced edges in most of the landscape.

When the sky area has dried, start adding some free, distant landscape details with color mixtures used in the sky with the addition of Grass Green and Neutral Tint for the farthest hills. See how you can use a dry brush to let white paper appear through the implied snow.

Hold the paper straight. With a mixture of French Ultramarine, Permanent Pink and Blue Vinzor, color the shadow cast by the wall. Pay particular attention to the right edge: the shadows should "sit" exactly at the level of the earth's surface, describing the angle at which the earth is located. The selected compound will granulate, add granularity and a more saturated structure to the snow. Within the shaded area, add more concentrated blends of blue and purple to add some zest.

The dark granite wall provides significant contrast mainly in light painting. Draw it with various mixes of French Ultramarine and Sienna Burnt or French Ultramarine and Transparent Brown Oxide. Create a structure by adding darker mixtures to the stones as if they were dry, but you should not do it where it recedes into the background, as this will distract attention.

With a good sable brush (size 6), start adding texture and details to distant hills. Use a mixture of French Ultramarine with Brown Oxide, Natural Siena with Burnt Siena, and Herb Green with French Ultramarine to paint it in trees and shrubs. Keep the brush very dry and add some snowy texture to the area above the main wall.

Be careful not to make the tones of distant parts too strong. Select some of the nooks and crannies in the wall and use the French Ultramarine with a Neutral Tint.

Remove masking fluid. With the same mixture of French Ultramarine and Permanent Pink used for the shadow of the wall painted in the snow on the peaks, leave a few unpainted areas for brightly lit areas. Pay attention to the rounded, dark edges of the snow to indicate its depth.

For pillars, use a mixture of French Ultramarine and Clear Brown Oxide, as well as twigs and grass stems that are pushed out from under the snow. Use a damp brush to soften some of the shaded areas.

Finally, add some white gouache to the sides and tops of the posts, and apply some snowflakes if you feel the need.

Manual drawing method

Just dot the dots with a brush dipped in masking liquid so that they look like snowflakes.

Pros: it is simple and you can control the movements of the brush.

Minuses: resembles a polka dot pattern.

Spray method

Dip the brush in masking liquid and take it with one hand. With one or two fingers, gently tap on the part of the brush that is closer to the bristles. Drops of masking liquid will fall in a certain area, but still they are difficult to control.

Pros: It looks more natural.

Minuses: it's hard to predict where the drops will fall.

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